Fort Detrick Soldier Wins STRATCOM Poster Contest

Sgt. Christopher Giddinge of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases stands by his winning poster
Sgt. Christopher Giddinge of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases stands by his winning poster. He entered in a poster contest sponsored by the U.S. Army Command's Strategic Communication Directorate.

Congratulations to Sgt. Christopher Giddinge of United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases for his winning entry in a poster contest sponsored by the U.S. Army Command's Strategic Communication Directorate. The challenge was to create a poster that "emulates the successful transition of the Army Combat Medic from the skill set of 91B to today's 68W." The contest was open to all Soldiers and Army Civilians, and the winner was selected by a committee at MEDCOM Headquarters.

Giddinge is a Health Care Specialist (68W) assigned to the Special Immunizations Program within USAMRIID's Medical Division. He proudly serves as a protocol assistant and travel coordinator for the SIP within the Medical Division. Prior to joining USAMRIID, Giddinge served five years with 1/36 Infantry First Armored Division. He served as a trauma medic during his first combat tour in Baghdad and exemplified his dedication to the unit by reenlisting for stabilization to complete a second tour in the Anbar Province.

Giddinge's medical and battlefield experiences in Iraq motivated and inspired him to work with veterans and Wounded Warriors. He recently reenlisted to become an Occupational Therapist Assistant and hopes to apply these skills assisting in the rehabilitation of Wounded Warriors, and eventually in a second career with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

At a recent ceremony, Lt. Gen. Eric B. Schoomaker, U.S. Army Surgeon General, unveiled the winning poster designed by Giddinge.

"You captured the very essence of what it means to be a 68W," Schoomaker wrote on his blog. "Thank you for your dedication to Army Medicine."

Last Modified Date: 30-Mar-2010