USAMMA Hosts Sgt. Maj. Change of Responsibility Ceremony

Traditional passing of the organizational colors

With the traditional passing of the organizational colors through U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency Commander Col. David R. Gibson (middle), the role of USAMMA's senior enlisted advisor transitions from Sgt. Maj. Leo Anderson (left) to Sgt. Maj. Thomas R. Vatcher (right) in a ceremony at the Fort Detrick auditorium Nov. 13. (Photo by Ellen Crown, USAMRMC Public Affairs)

The U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency leadership hosted a change of responsibility ceremony at the Fort Detrick auditorium Nov. 13, welcoming a new sergeant major to the organization.

With the traditional passing of the organizational colors, Sgt. Maj. Leo Anderson transitioned the role of USAMMA's senior enlisted advisor to Sgt. Maj. Thomas R. Vatcher.

USAMMA Commander Col. David R. Gibson presided over the ceremony and spoke about the value that sergeant majors bring to the Army. He lauded their ability to develop and lead, as well as serve as examples for all Soldiers.

"They exhibit what 'right' looks like," said Gibson, in reference to sergeant majors.

Anderson has held the position of sergeant major at the USAMMA for three years. He will retire from the Army in approximately six months after more than 30 years of active-duty service.

Vatcher is originally from Rochester, New Hampshire, and is trained as a combat medic. He has served in a variety of overseas assignments in Germany, as well as deployments to Macedonia, Haiti, Albania, Iraq and Afghanistan.

The USAMMA is a multifaceted organization that is globally managing strategic medical logistics contingency programs; medically equipping active, reserve and National Guard forces; and providing technical solutions at medical treatment facilities. An essential part of Army Medicine and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, the USAMMA's mission is to develop, tailor, deliver and sustain medical materiel capabilities in order to build and enable health readiness by equipping and sustaining the medical force.

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Last Modified Date: 17-Nov-2015