The U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research receives Force Health Protection Award

Soldiers at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research proudly surround their award.
Soldiers at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research proudly surround their award. (Photo by Thomas Moore)

The Association of Military Surgeons of the United States held its 115th annual meeting in St. Louis, Mo. Nov. 18.

The U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research received its first ever Force Health Protection Award. The award was presented to the USAISR in recognition of its "significant contributions in delivering lifesaving care, advanced trauma systems and innovative research products to America's Warriors."

The Force Health Protection Award is a group award recognizing an organization or team that has made the greatest contribution to assure that the men and women of the armed services and/or veterans are provided health services to assure mission readiness or optimal health functionality at all times. The concept of force health protection goes beyond the military and includes humanitarian and disaster relief, physical and occupational rehabilitation, as well as the work of the Public Health Service to provide force health protection to the nation threatened by disease, a natural disaster, or acts of terrorism or war.

According to Maj. Gen George Anderson, U.S. Air Force, MC (Ret), AMSUS Executive Director, "This is a highly prestigious award and the USAISR is clearly the most deserving DoD recipient."

"Receiving the first ever Force Health Protection Award is a tremendous honor for the military, civilians, and contractors of the USAISR. It reflects our dedication and commitment to the health of our warriors. Every day we conduct combat casualty care research to lessen the mortality and morbidity associated with battlefield injuries and we provide the best burn care found anywhere in the world. Receiving this award is very, very inspiring to us - we thank AMSUS for this recognition," said Col. Lorne Blackbourne, ISR commander.

Last Modified Date: 24-Dec-2009